Common Path of Egress Travel

Common Path of Egress vs Travel Distance

According to the BC Definitions, the COMMON PATH OF EGRESS TRAVEL is “that portion of exit access which the occupants are required to traverse before two separate and distinct paths of egress travel to two exits are available. Paths that merge are common paths of travel. Common paths of egress travel shall be included within the permitted travel distance.”

It’s easy to get COMMON PATH OF EGRESS TRAVEL confused with TRAVEL DISTANCE, especially since they can often be the same. When it comes to the design of a MEANS OF EGRESS SYSTEM, we are mostly concerned with TRAVEL DISTANCE.

When is Common Path of Egress Travel Important?

The COMMON PATH OF EGRESS TRAVEL is important when trying to determine the NUMBER OF EXITS REQUIRED, or more specifically, checking to see if you can get away with only one means of egress from a space. In the case where one exit is permitted, the COMMON PATH OF EGRESS TRAVEL must be measured from the most remote point of an occupied space all the way to the EXIT DISCHARGE (door that leads to the exterior of the building).

Space with One Means of Egress

Space with One Means of Egress

 

Relevant Sections of BC

Section BC 1002 Definitions

Section BC 1013.3 Common Path of Egress Travel

 


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